ADHD Awareness Month


October is national Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Awareness Month. In light of this, the Center for Behavioral Health (CBH) would like to share some information about ADHD. ADHD is a disorder characterized by trouble paying attention, excessive activity, and sometimes impulsive behavior. Most people tend to think of ADHD as a disorder for children, but many adults live with ADHD too! ADHD affects people of all races, gender identities, and ages. Here at the CBH, we are a place for people who struggle with ADHD symptoms to seek help.

The Center for Disease Control (2018) and American Psychiatric Association estimates that about 5% of children have ADHD, and that number may be low due to under-diagnosis. ADHD tends to go undiagnosed in females due to the difference in the presentation of symptoms between males and females. To a lesser extent, ADHD may also be over-diagnosed in males because typical behavior of male children can be similar to ADHD in some cases.

Many adults also live with ADHD, and their symptoms can include: trouble following directions, remembering information, trouble concentrating, finding it difficult to organize tasks, and struggling to finish work on time.  The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH, 2017) estimates that about 4.4% of adults have ADHD. Adults with ADHD are often difficult to diagnose because it’s not just lack of focus that is a symptom. Additionally, hyper focus is a potential symptom of adult ADHD. This occurs when a person gets so engrossed in a task that they can become unaware of their surroundings which in turn, can lead to stressed relationships and relationship issues. These issues can range in severity, ranging from mild to significant impairment but no matter the severity, it is always the right time to reach out for help!

At the CBH, we believe access to mental health services are important regardless of your age. If you or your children struggle with symptoms of ADHD, the CBH is here to help! Our trained clinicians can help you get a handle on your symptoms and gain better control of your everyday life. Clinicians at the CBH can provide assessments to identify ADHD as a potential problem, and can provide therapy and interventions to teach helpful strategies to better handle ADHD symptoms.

The CBH is dedicated to providing these services at an affordable cost for all, so be sure to email us at behavioralhealth@spalding.edu, call us at (502) 792-7011, or visit behavioralhealth.spalding.edu for more information.